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What GOOD magazine is doing to make us even greater

October 20, 2009 12 Comments

Reading Time: 2 minutes
Credit: GOOD Magazine

Credit: GOOD Magazine

I follow GOOD magazine on twitter and have been receiving tweets about the first ever GOOD 100, which celebrates the most exciting entrepreneurs of the year. So I went to their site and spent some time exploring the companies that are changing the way we live.

Each of them is brilliant and inspiring in their own right (I thought Umair Haque’s entry was spectacular), yet what really excites me is the fact that these companies are being celebrated.

It’s one thing to applaud a CSR, best practices or green initiative by an existing brand (either building their image or compensating for past practices). It’s another altogether to celebrate new companies that have positioned themselves smack bang in the middle of the positive change space.

Suddenly the usual challenges that attend company growth – innovation, expansion, and profitability – all take place in and around businesses that benefit us all.

And by supporting them we are not just enabling companies of change to be born, but we are giving birth to entire industries of change. (We see this already with bio and green tech).

As more and more industries like this are born, what constitutes a ‘for profit’ business and drives the engine of capitalism will shift from a focus of self interest to the greater good of all.

The multiple global crisis we face (energy, the environment, climate change, the disparity of wealth between rich and poor, water as a resource, education, women’s rights) demand a wider definition of self-interest that includes the well-being of everyone on the planet.

This is not idealism but simple expediency as the planet we live on, the resources we use and the way we do business cannot survive indefinitely with today’s crises.

That work of change must be done before it’s too late. Especially since the lessons of September 2008 seem to have been again forgotten so quickly if Wall Street profits and pay are any guide.

Our survival, well-being and wealth depend on new companies, industries and a global economy built on sustainable practices (in every sense of the word). So here’s to GOOD magazine for celebrating entrepreneurs whose vision for their future includes transforming ours.

NOTE: In light of recent discussions around FTC blogger rules, I should point out this is not a sponsored post, I have no financial or “gift” relationships with any brands including GOOD Magazine, and I have no ghost writers for my posts. I just think GOOD Magazine is doing something really powerful by celebrating this next crop of entrepreneurs (as do Forbes, Inc, Businessweek, Fast Company, CSRWire, WSJ). So here’s to the GOOD 1000! Or 10,000!

READ MORE FROM SIMON MAINWARING!

12 responses to “What GOOD magazine is doing to make us even greater”

  1. mary fagot says:

    agree one hundred percent!  plus it looks so damn GOOD!

  2. mary fagot says:

    agree one hundred percent!  plus it looks so damn GOOD!

  3. admin says:

    I completely agree. their design sensibility and infographics are amazing. and all that makes such a difference to how the information is received. Thanks and hope all’s well, Simon

  4. admin says:

    I completely agree. their design sensibility and infographics are amazing. and all that makes such a difference to how the information is received. Thanks and hope all’s well, Simon

  5. romy says:

    I am a fan of GOOD. Their communication through design is excellent.  I am also a fan of the growing movement to switch the paradigm of the capitalist system from hoarding for a few to benefiting the many. Making money isn’t a bad thing in itself. It’s just another resource. The real problem is the making and dispersing of products or by-products that pollute the planet and our psyches in order to have and hoard money.
    There was a really great show on the Sundance Channel called Big Ideas For A Small Planet. It showcased indepedent businesses in a broad spectrum of industries. They profiled people who are figuring out how to stop harming the environment while still making a profit. I hear the show has been cancelled. It’s too bad. I learned a lot from it.
    Thanks for sharing Simon.
     

  6. romy says:

    I am a fan of GOOD. Their communication through design is excellent.  I am also a fan of the growing movement to switch the paradigm of the capitalist system from hoarding for a few to benefiting the many. Making money isn’t a bad thing in itself. It’s just another resource. The real problem is the making and dispersing of products or by-products that pollute the planet and our psyches in order to have and hoard money.
    There was a really great show on the Sundance Channel called Big Ideas For A Small Planet. It showcased indepedent businesses in a broad spectrum of industries. They profiled people who are figuring out how to stop harming the environment while still making a profit. I hear the show has been cancelled. It’s too bad. I learned a lot from it.
    Thanks for sharing Simon.
     

  7. admin says:

    Romy,
    I couldn’t agree more and one of the very few benefits of last year’s terrible economic meltdown was that companies were exposed for purely selfish practices that hurt many other people and now they need to work hard to rebuild their images. That said, I agree about how sad it is about the Sundance show. I think there is still work to be done to make sustainability and personal accountability a source of civic pride. Only then with those sort of shows get the popular support they deserve. Till then, let’s support each other in this direction in our lives and professional work. Thanks so much for the input, Simon
     

  8. admin says:

    Romy,

    I couldn’t agree more and one of the very few benefits of last year’s terrible economic meltdown was that companies were exposed for purely selfish practices that hurt many other people and now they need to work hard to rebuild their images. That said, I agree about how sad it is about the Sundance show. I think there is still work to be done to make sustainability and personal accountability a source of civic pride. Only then with those sort of shows get the popular support they deserve. Till then, let’s support each other in this direction in our lives and professional work. Thanks so much for the input, Simon

     

  9. Wilson says:

    Thanks Simon for highlighting The GOOD100. The notion of brand, besides acting as DNA for a company and what it stands for, is increasingly shifting to include how that brand contributes to the society. Many established Fortune 100 companies are involved in some measure to improving the lives of people around us. We never forget that a key responsibility of a business is to be profitable. I think these crop of entrepreneurs are reminding us of another important role of any business: to be a positive force for our community’s well-being.

  10. Wilson says:

    Thanks Simon for highlighting The GOOD100. The notion of brand, besides acting as DNA for a company and what it stands for, is increasingly shifting to include how that brand contributes to the society. Many established Fortune 100 companies are involved in some measure to improving the lives of people around us. We never forget that a key responsibility of a business is to be profitable. I think these crop of entrepreneurs are reminding us of another important role of any business: to be a positive force for our community’s well-being.

  11. admin says:

    Thanks Wilson and I completely agree. The days of solely serving shareholders are over simply because their interests are now best served when you look after the communities and world they live in. Contribution and profit are increasingly inseparable and that’s a very exciting shift in business. Thanks for your thoughts, Simon

  12. admin says:

    Thanks Wilson and I completely agree. The days of solely serving shareholders are over simply because their interests are now best served when you look after the communities and world they live in. Contribution and profit are increasingly inseparable and that’s a very exciting shift in business. Thanks for your thoughts, Simon

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Simon Mainwaring

Reading Time: 1 minutesSimon Mainwaring is the founder of We First, a leading brand consultancy that provides purpose-driven strategy, content, and training that empowers companies to lead business, shape culture, and better our world.

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